Educational Attainment and the British Indian Sub-Continent Origin Vote By Sarinder Joshua

They say be careful about what you wish for, are British Indians entering a cauldron of ingredients full of division and hate?

For the many not the few, this is Jeremy’s equality mantra and given the last election result it has become evident that this is clearly resonating with the British public.

There is another issue of concern relating to what we would classify as for the many and not the few.

I am referring to the education opportunities in the nation and who are becoming the beneficiaries of the divisions that have been placed in our society since the Tories have been in power and their attempt at the ‘Big Society’.

It is evident from the statistics that the white working-class males are not excelling in education and they have become sound recruits for the populist mantra and the far right.

Are we supposed to believe that this is all the ‘fault of the foreigner within our midst’?

Is it the case that we must surrender to the belief that the ‘white British are lazy at work and educational engagement’ and leave it at that conclusion?

No! I disagree with these socially disruptive and falsehood statements that are brandished around like hearsay that is providing entertainment whilst there is a power cut for hours and people make up folklore to pass the time of day until the light returns.

The facts do reflect that the white working classes are falling behind in education, the highest performers are Indian & Chinese origin children in our schools.

One can agree that the investment in education within these cultures is of paramount importance.

We need to understand why this is the situation, I am of Indian origin, third generation, and I have my own perception of why this is the case.

Firstly, the white working classes have traditionally been directed towards apprenticeships and other trades.

This is no longer available in abundance and there is no doubt that the white working classes have suffered terribly from the demise of the extended family ethos and communities have been broken by the selfishness and self-centred ethos implementation of the Thatcher years that were continued by subsequent Tory governments.

The white working classes were ignored on an industrial scale once they were subjected to buying their council homes and generating money for the economy in the eighties. Did they ever recover from that Thatcher initiative?

I always believed this was to place the working classes in debt by having mortgages, so they would think twice about striking and rebelling against an employer.

On the other hand, we can look at first generation Indian sub-Continent immigration and ask ourselves why were they ignored and not subjected to integration and better race relations.

Why suddenly are third and fourth generation Indian sub-Continent origin British nationals being embraced by the Tories? The answer is simple, the Tory Conservative mindset that promotes business, family and traditional values resonates with the British Indian community.

However, their parents always voted Labour as a safety net due to the threat of being thrown out of the U.K.

We can’t ignore the Birmingham speech by Enoch Powell most popularly known as the Rivers of Blood speech and that many Indian origin immigrants were expelled from Uganda by Idi Amin. Once these immigrants, of which many were British nationals in the first place settled into Leicester and implemented their business acumen, they became of interest. Prior to their arrival they were encouraged not to come to the U.K and were met with anger in many cases.

Naturally the first generation would have been petrified about their status in this nation and saw the socialist outlook of Labour to be a safer vote and most of all a secure move to make; resting assured that they would not be thrown out of this nation.

Education is essential to people of Indian origin, there are cultural traits that dictate excellent results in education. For a lot of parents their pension policy is their children and the oldest son is expected to look after his parents in old age, one can only do this if the financial resources are available to do so.

The other issue that is of a major concern is the status symbol of education and caste, we know the Indian caste system is an abhorrent system of dehumanisation and it has found its way into this society without being questioned or opposed by all political domains in the early days of Indian sub-Continent immigration.

The exception to this is Jeremy Corbyn who has publicly opposed the caste system and has not been afraid of the multicultural appeasement agenda in doing so.

For many who immigrated here in the early years of the fifties and sixties it was to their amazement that they could even sit on a chair and do their work in a classroom whereas, in India if one was from a scheduled caste or regarded as an untouchable one would be humiliated and made to sit on the floor of the class whilst the higher castes were given preferential treatment by being given chairs and desks.

This gave many the hope that education should be embraced and most of all the opportunity; is it any surprise most of them have done well in the fields of education and employment by having an opportunity that does not dehumanise them.

I am convinced that the white working classes have been left behind by the Tories so that apathy is developed into voter stagnation and they rebel against Labour and choose the populist vote.

As for the Indian origin third and fourth generations they have been subjected to corporate appeasement rather than multicultural appeasement by the Tories. Did they care about them as first-generation immigrants?

Now that India is doing well in an economic sense we are seeing the Tories embracing the third and fourth generations, David Cameron’s warm up act at Wembley Stadium when PM Modi arrived here was a classic example. Even though many see his government as a theocratic lead government the Tories still are ignoring the concerns and pushing the division agenda. He went as far as speaking Hindi on stage and making the statement that there will be an Indian origin Prime Minister in Downing Street one day, if there will be a Tory PM it will certainly be one that is moulded into the expectation of the Tory prototype.

The divisions are evident, we are seeing a shift in ethnic minority voting patterns.

In the 2015 election we saw 1.6 million ethnic minority voters support Labour and for the first time the Conservatives managed to get 1 million ethnic minority voters.

However, the area of concern is the origin of the voters and the divisions that are being created. Muslims and Christian ethnic minorities are still voting for Labour and the Tories know this very well indeed.

Historically there have been divisions between these communities, the partition of India and Pakistan is evidence of this but what are we seeing now in the U.K, have we moved to a new category in the class divide?

Is it now evident that minorities within minorities will become categorised by a new class hierarchy structure that is only applicable to ethnic minorities in this nation?

The Conservatives have clearly managed to convince the professional British Indian community to vote for them and thus create a new class in society.

In my youth, people of Asian origin would only really stay in cities and in their city suburbs at the most, now we are seeing third and fourth generation people moving into the areas that are Conservative and rural. To fit in and get the best employment opportunities and display their educational prowess they are certainly managing to change their voting intention and social integration; falling straight into the hands of the Conservative plot to create a new division in society.

It is evident from the research that the Conservatives are focusing on the Hindu vote, 41% voted Conservative and 49% Labour. Muslim voters were very different in their behavioural pattern, 64% Labour and 25% Conservative.

Whilst the Tories are placing political expediency before equality the gulf between British Indian, Chinese and white British within education is increasing rapidly.

Students with five or more GCSEs at A*- C grade or equivalent in 2014-15 was immense in difference.

Chinese origin students reached 86.8%, Indian origin students reached 80.8%, white British 65.9%, Pakistani origin 62.4% and Black Caribbean reached 58.1%.

Obviously, we know that fuel poverty and food poverty have increased immensely over the years so when one looks at the same figures for those who are in receipt of free school meals there is a bigger gulf of a difference.

Chinese origin girls reached 80.6%, Chinese origin boys 67.6% Bangladeshi origin girls 59.6% and Indian origin girls 58.2%.

The national average is 57.1% for this category in receipt of free school meals, the figures plummet from the national average indicating that the groups that need the most help are clearly becoming victims of social exclusion due to the Tories and their desire not to have a cohesive and fair society.

Black Caribbean girls 40.9%, White British girls, 32.0%, Black Caribbean boys 24.4% and White British boys 24%.

If the Conservatives call these figures a success I would like to ask them what a failure looks like.

Some in the media have been critical of Jeremy Corbyn, highlighting that his opposition to the caste system and a greater vision for welfare reform will not resonate with the British Indian community.

My view is steadfast on these views that are being brandished around, we don’t need to appease to one social evil to keep the multicultural appeasement ethos happy!

Where there is an injustice we need to stand up against it in full force and hold our ground.

I will not tolerate appeasement to keep a segment of the British Indian or any other community happy, if a practice is not conducive to the laws and values of this land it has no place within it.

Jeremy Corbyn is working to prohibit this abhorrent system of caste discrimination in our nation.

It is evident that the Tories are willing to appease those who are supporters of this system to continue with their fast pace of recruitment and voter retention among the Hindu & Sikh communities.

There are many who still support caste based temples and see Jeremy Corbyn’s stance as an impingement to their culture or some would rightfully call it social apartheid.

Jeremy Corbyn has been on the case since 2012 to ensure that greater equality is displayed within the British Indian community by dealing with the issue of caste discrimination.

An equal society must be equal in all its components, where political expediency exploits differences for its own advantages it is a gross act of selfishness and indirect hate implantation; the Tories have already imposed this ethos to the white working classes.

Now it seems they are working their way into the British Indian community.

Do not forget, colonialism was not successful without those who wanted to benefit from the arrival of the menace on their shores.

Can we justifiably state that Priti Patel and others have the same ethos of the collaborator where they benefited from engaging and dancing to the tune of the Tories?

We do know that even UKIP became victims of the Tory plot, the Tories always wanted to control immigration but after Enoch Powell’s speech they were very careful how they tread on the terrain of immigration.

One could argue that UKIP played the tune that the Tories wanted to broadcast and hear but were not willing to speak the language that UKIP were using.

My perspective as a British Indian is not unique, I am free in this nation and I am a proud British citizen and a convert to the Christian Roman Catholic faith.

I am glad that I am free to choose my faith and be free to express my opinion, having the support of a new proper socialist leader who believes in the defence of his citizens against such inequalities be it economic, geographical or caste based discrimination is assuring and strengthens my identity as a British national of Indian origin.

I call those who disagree with Jeremy to come forward and argue with him over his stance against discrimination.

It is the next challenge that we face where a new division is being manufactured and supported, British Indians can argue that they are free to vote for who they want.

The issue here is, are they aware of the new class divide that is being created under the guise of practicing democracy by voting for the Tories or are they welcoming a new-found class that is only promoting division?

It has happened to the white working classes and created a massive surge in voting for populism and a recruitment ground for the far right.

Will British Indians sub consciously or deliberately make life harder for themselves if they become the victims of populism and the far right; will their ‘new’ Tory friends come to their rescue when there is hate breeding in society and they become the victims of their own desire to be part of the Tory elite?

Sources:

DFE,

University of Leicester,

The Economist November 2015

British Future.

Lisa Mulholland- The Avenger Review: Money Power Love’ by Joss Sheldon

By Lisa Mulholland 

“Three friends, united by nature, divided by  nurture”

As soon as I read the first page of this book , that is released tomorrow; I knew I that I would love this tale and that it would be one of those ‘unputdownable’ novels. From the outset it is clear that this fictitious story that’s based on real life events has an underlying moral message. 

When it opened with the nature and nurture debate on the first page, I was hooked.

We start with three men born 3 seconds apart in the same hospital. And we follow the twists and turns of their lives with their very different fates and fortunes guiding the way.  And then we are transported by Sheldons’ words, back into the 1700s. His vivid descriptions bring to life the smells of the workhouse, the visuals of the muddy, dreary banks of London and the motivations and dreams of each of the main characters Hugo, Archibald and Mayer.

It is a compelling tale that has underlying messages about the class system of the this country, while it allows us to rethink some of our own beliefs that we may have had instilled in us from a young age. It bravely challenges us to challenge our own beliefs when we see how three men are divided and connected at the same time. 

I couldn’t help but draw parallels with the issues raised in the story and the issues we are faced with today in Tory Britain. 300 years on from the time period of when this story is set, we are still faced with similar issues, such as attitudes towards migrants, poverty and education.

It’s quite a revelation despite being a politics graduate, to learn historical facts about the origins of money, debt and economics. I have learned so much that I had not expected to learn and I have actually now been inspired to research more into British history, and the origins of class and will probably be blogging about these subjects in the near future, thanks to Sheldon.


For those readers that might not normally be interested in these subjects , I would say that this story stands alone as an interesting, engaging and thought provoking story for anyone! 


Even those not usually interested in politics or economics. And that is because this writer weaves facts in with a story that is captivating: we desperately need to know what happens to these characters who are motivated by very different things; money, power and love.

I thoroughly enjoyed it and like any good book I feel a little piece of this will stay with me forever.

My message to any potential reader would be to read this book and just enjoy the tale it tells. If you feel inspired as I do to reflect on the wider issues it addresses or if you find that Rolling Stones song reference (I challenge you to find it) then that is an added bonus!


The book goes on sale tomorrow:

https://www.amazon.com/Money-Power-Love-Joss-Sheldon-ebook/dp/B075L6CCFZ

Tories Crusade For Morals Does Not Apply To Themselves

By Kelly Grehan

 

Hearing Jacob Rees-Mogg this week brought back memories of my youth in the 1990s when Tory MPs often saw fit to take up moralising.  There was John Redwood‘s condemnation of “young women [who] have babies with no apparent intention of even trying marriage or a stable relationship with the father of the child,” Peter Lilley‘s description of single mothers as “benefit-driven” and “undeserving” and of course then Prime Minister John Major’s ill fated ‘Back To Basics’ campaign in which he declared the Conservative Party as the Party of morality.  Of course, in the years that followed the Major government became synonymous with scandal as Tory MPs, too numerous to mention were outed for affairs and Major himself was revealed to have had a four year affair with Edwina Currie.

 

So , keeping with Tory tradition,  Rees-Mogg, who once wrote an article in The Telegraph in defence of zero-hours contracts, is against foreign aid and who wishes to see the Human Rights Act abolished, this week gave his thoughts on abortion, a right won by women in this country in 1968, saying

 

“The Catholic Church’s teachings are authoritative. There is a moral absolute on abortion — that it is wrong. To take a life after a rape is not the answer. Life begins at the point of conception.  One can only feel compassion for a woman in these situations — which, of course are rare — but it’s hard to see how taking a child’s life makes them better.’

He, having voted against equal marriage, voiced his continued opposition to it.  Maybe he has not noticed that the sky has not fallen in since the fight for lgbt rights was won.

 

Asked whether he would attend a wedding ceremony where both participants were of the same sex he replied ‘ It’s not for me to enforce my morals on others.’  I find this very odd, as if marrying the person you love and want to spend your life with has some sort of moral or immoral connotation.  You know what I see as being morally indefensible?  Voting for policies that encourage poverty, poor health, social division Rees-Mogg’s voting record shows he has no interest in policies supporting better lives for children or families. For example he has

  • consistently voted against against paying higher benefits over longer periods for those unable to work due to illness or disability
  • voted for the bedroom tax, against spending public money to create guaranteed jobs for young people who have spent a long time unemployed
  • voted against a law to make private vehicles smoke-free if a child is present
  • voted against calling on the Government to ensure women and protected groups are not disproportionately impacted by tax and benefit changes and against publication of a gender equality strategy to improve the position of women,
  • voted for ending financial support for some 16-19 year olds in training and further education

 

-I could go on.

 

Another thing I find immoral is people bringing children into this world and being dis-interested in bringing them up!

 

Rees-Mogg this week admitted he said he is not a “modern man” and had never changed a nappy, despite being a father of 6.  In response, former Deputy Labour Leader Harriet Harman, referred to him as a ‘deadbeat dad.’

 

Some may see Mogg’s children who attend the same £14,000 a year school Prince Charles attended as very privileged.  The nanny they have is the same one who raised Rees-Mogg before he went to Eton.  Isn’t it odd that those of lower status who admit to not taking care of their own children, (and I do not mean when they are at work) are held up on various ‘poverty porn’ TV shows for ridicule, but wealthy people who absolve themselves of providing care  for their own children are seen as ‘eccentric?’  I can just imagine the view some of the tory MPs would take of a mother of 6, maybe working a low paid job, maybe with rent arrears who had six children and said she could not change their nappies!

 

Strangely different rules seem to apply to the rich.