Educational Attainment and the British Indian Sub-Continent Origin Vote By Sarinder Joshua

They say be careful about what you wish for, are British Indians entering a cauldron of ingredients full of division and hate?

For the many not the few, this is Jeremy’s equality mantra and given the last election result it has become evident that this is clearly resonating with the British public.

There is another issue of concern relating to what we would classify as for the many and not the few.

I am referring to the education opportunities in the nation and who are becoming the beneficiaries of the divisions that have been placed in our society since the Tories have been in power and their attempt at the ‘Big Society’.

It is evident from the statistics that the white working-class males are not excelling in education and they have become sound recruits for the populist mantra and the far right.

Are we supposed to believe that this is all the ‘fault of the foreigner within our midst’?

Is it the case that we must surrender to the belief that the ‘white British are lazy at work and educational engagement’ and leave it at that conclusion?

No! I disagree with these socially disruptive and falsehood statements that are brandished around like hearsay that is providing entertainment whilst there is a power cut for hours and people make up folklore to pass the time of day until the light returns.

The facts do reflect that the white working classes are falling behind in education, the highest performers are Indian & Chinese origin children in our schools.

One can agree that the investment in education within these cultures is of paramount importance.

We need to understand why this is the situation, I am of Indian origin, third generation, and I have my own perception of why this is the case.

Firstly, the white working classes have traditionally been directed towards apprenticeships and other trades.

This is no longer available in abundance and there is no doubt that the white working classes have suffered terribly from the demise of the extended family ethos and communities have been broken by the selfishness and self-centred ethos implementation of the Thatcher years that were continued by subsequent Tory governments.

The white working classes were ignored on an industrial scale once they were subjected to buying their council homes and generating money for the economy in the eighties. Did they ever recover from that Thatcher initiative?

I always believed this was to place the working classes in debt by having mortgages, so they would think twice about striking and rebelling against an employer.

On the other hand, we can look at first generation Indian sub-Continent immigration and ask ourselves why were they ignored and not subjected to integration and better race relations.

Why suddenly are third and fourth generation Indian sub-Continent origin British nationals being embraced by the Tories? The answer is simple, the Tory Conservative mindset that promotes business, family and traditional values resonates with the British Indian community.

However, their parents always voted Labour as a safety net due to the threat of being thrown out of the U.K.

We can’t ignore the Birmingham speech by Enoch Powell most popularly known as the Rivers of Blood speech and that many Indian origin immigrants were expelled from Uganda by Idi Amin. Once these immigrants, of which many were British nationals in the first place settled into Leicester and implemented their business acumen, they became of interest. Prior to their arrival they were encouraged not to come to the U.K and were met with anger in many cases.

Naturally the first generation would have been petrified about their status in this nation and saw the socialist outlook of Labour to be a safer vote and most of all a secure move to make; resting assured that they would not be thrown out of this nation.

Education is essential to people of Indian origin, there are cultural traits that dictate excellent results in education. For a lot of parents their pension policy is their children and the oldest son is expected to look after his parents in old age, one can only do this if the financial resources are available to do so.

The other issue that is of a major concern is the status symbol of education and caste, we know the Indian caste system is an abhorrent system of dehumanisation and it has found its way into this society without being questioned or opposed by all political domains in the early days of Indian sub-Continent immigration.

The exception to this is Jeremy Corbyn who has publicly opposed the caste system and has not been afraid of the multicultural appeasement agenda in doing so.

For many who immigrated here in the early years of the fifties and sixties it was to their amazement that they could even sit on a chair and do their work in a classroom whereas, in India if one was from a scheduled caste or regarded as an untouchable one would be humiliated and made to sit on the floor of the class whilst the higher castes were given preferential treatment by being given chairs and desks.

This gave many the hope that education should be embraced and most of all the opportunity; is it any surprise most of them have done well in the fields of education and employment by having an opportunity that does not dehumanise them.

I am convinced that the white working classes have been left behind by the Tories so that apathy is developed into voter stagnation and they rebel against Labour and choose the populist vote.

As for the Indian origin third and fourth generations they have been subjected to corporate appeasement rather than multicultural appeasement by the Tories. Did they care about them as first-generation immigrants?

Now that India is doing well in an economic sense we are seeing the Tories embracing the third and fourth generations, David Cameron’s warm up act at Wembley Stadium when PM Modi arrived here was a classic example. Even though many see his government as a theocratic lead government the Tories still are ignoring the concerns and pushing the division agenda. He went as far as speaking Hindi on stage and making the statement that there will be an Indian origin Prime Minister in Downing Street one day, if there will be a Tory PM it will certainly be one that is moulded into the expectation of the Tory prototype.

The divisions are evident, we are seeing a shift in ethnic minority voting patterns.

In the 2015 election we saw 1.6 million ethnic minority voters support Labour and for the first time the Conservatives managed to get 1 million ethnic minority voters.

However, the area of concern is the origin of the voters and the divisions that are being created. Muslims and Christian ethnic minorities are still voting for Labour and the Tories know this very well indeed.

Historically there have been divisions between these communities, the partition of India and Pakistan is evidence of this but what are we seeing now in the U.K, have we moved to a new category in the class divide?

Is it now evident that minorities within minorities will become categorised by a new class hierarchy structure that is only applicable to ethnic minorities in this nation?

The Conservatives have clearly managed to convince the professional British Indian community to vote for them and thus create a new class in society.

In my youth, people of Asian origin would only really stay in cities and in their city suburbs at the most, now we are seeing third and fourth generation people moving into the areas that are Conservative and rural. To fit in and get the best employment opportunities and display their educational prowess they are certainly managing to change their voting intention and social integration; falling straight into the hands of the Conservative plot to create a new division in society.

It is evident from the research that the Conservatives are focusing on the Hindu vote, 41% voted Conservative and 49% Labour. Muslim voters were very different in their behavioural pattern, 64% Labour and 25% Conservative.

Whilst the Tories are placing political expediency before equality the gulf between British Indian, Chinese and white British within education is increasing rapidly.

Students with five or more GCSEs at A*- C grade or equivalent in 2014-15 was immense in difference.

Chinese origin students reached 86.8%, Indian origin students reached 80.8%, white British 65.9%, Pakistani origin 62.4% and Black Caribbean reached 58.1%.

Obviously, we know that fuel poverty and food poverty have increased immensely over the years so when one looks at the same figures for those who are in receipt of free school meals there is a bigger gulf of a difference.

Chinese origin girls reached 80.6%, Chinese origin boys 67.6% Bangladeshi origin girls 59.6% and Indian origin girls 58.2%.

The national average is 57.1% for this category in receipt of free school meals, the figures plummet from the national average indicating that the groups that need the most help are clearly becoming victims of social exclusion due to the Tories and their desire not to have a cohesive and fair society.

Black Caribbean girls 40.9%, White British girls, 32.0%, Black Caribbean boys 24.4% and White British boys 24%.

If the Conservatives call these figures a success I would like to ask them what a failure looks like.

Some in the media have been critical of Jeremy Corbyn, highlighting that his opposition to the caste system and a greater vision for welfare reform will not resonate with the British Indian community.

My view is steadfast on these views that are being brandished around, we don’t need to appease to one social evil to keep the multicultural appeasement ethos happy!

Where there is an injustice we need to stand up against it in full force and hold our ground.

I will not tolerate appeasement to keep a segment of the British Indian or any other community happy, if a practice is not conducive to the laws and values of this land it has no place within it.

Jeremy Corbyn is working to prohibit this abhorrent system of caste discrimination in our nation.

It is evident that the Tories are willing to appease those who are supporters of this system to continue with their fast pace of recruitment and voter retention among the Hindu & Sikh communities.

There are many who still support caste based temples and see Jeremy Corbyn’s stance as an impingement to their culture or some would rightfully call it social apartheid.

Jeremy Corbyn has been on the case since 2012 to ensure that greater equality is displayed within the British Indian community by dealing with the issue of caste discrimination.

An equal society must be equal in all its components, where political expediency exploits differences for its own advantages it is a gross act of selfishness and indirect hate implantation; the Tories have already imposed this ethos to the white working classes.

Now it seems they are working their way into the British Indian community.

Do not forget, colonialism was not successful without those who wanted to benefit from the arrival of the menace on their shores.

Can we justifiably state that Priti Patel and others have the same ethos of the collaborator where they benefited from engaging and dancing to the tune of the Tories?

We do know that even UKIP became victims of the Tory plot, the Tories always wanted to control immigration but after Enoch Powell’s speech they were very careful how they tread on the terrain of immigration.

One could argue that UKIP played the tune that the Tories wanted to broadcast and hear but were not willing to speak the language that UKIP were using.

My perspective as a British Indian is not unique, I am free in this nation and I am a proud British citizen and a convert to the Christian Roman Catholic faith.

I am glad that I am free to choose my faith and be free to express my opinion, having the support of a new proper socialist leader who believes in the defence of his citizens against such inequalities be it economic, geographical or caste based discrimination is assuring and strengthens my identity as a British national of Indian origin.

I call those who disagree with Jeremy to come forward and argue with him over his stance against discrimination.

It is the next challenge that we face where a new division is being manufactured and supported, British Indians can argue that they are free to vote for who they want.

The issue here is, are they aware of the new class divide that is being created under the guise of practicing democracy by voting for the Tories or are they welcoming a new-found class that is only promoting division?

It has happened to the white working classes and created a massive surge in voting for populism and a recruitment ground for the far right.

Will British Indians sub consciously or deliberately make life harder for themselves if they become the victims of populism and the far right; will their ‘new’ Tory friends come to their rescue when there is hate breeding in society and they become the victims of their own desire to be part of the Tory elite?

Sources:

DFE,

University of Leicester,

The Economist November 2015

British Future.

The Bitter Betrayal Of the Working Classes By The Populists and The Far Right By Sarinder Joshua Duroch

People are always adamant that pure hatred comes from the far right; most of the time they are correct because it comes in the form of violence and pre-mediated criminal activity.

Let’s take a step back and look at the behaviour of the ‘70s and the National Front.

Enoch Powell made his Birmingham speech in 1968 and by the early ‘70s there was a huge rise in nationalistic behaviour in our nation. What was the conduit one may ask?

It is simple, the conduit was a form of populism and placing political expediency before the stability and well-being of our nation.

It was not only pure selfishness on the part of certain mainstream politicians but also talk of civil war and unrest. Using derogatory words in the Birmingham speech to describe black and ethnic minority communities was only fuelling the far right.

Enoch, made the speech and it became known as the ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech.

It caused uproar in this nation and he ended up having to resort to the politics of Northern Ireland after his expulsion from the Conservative party.

As a Conservative and well educated man, are we now assuming that this famous and well-read politician had something to do with the far-right?

The point that I am making here is that he clearly acted as the ignition that lit the fire of hatred that resulted in the working class rebelling against the minorities of this nation. We only need to recall how the working-class London dockers marched in complete unison and in favour of Enoch Powell, what message were they taking homes to their families after work?

Is it not evident that their children had fear in their hearts and minds because of the speech that was not reasonable in any way relating to promoting a cohesive and peaceful United Kingdom?

The dockers are a classic example of who the speech was aimed at, we only need to look at how there was a massive surge in recruitment to the National Front.

What did the National Front achieve?

They achieved not much, they managed to recruit a lot of young white working class men and turned them into robots of hate with no individual school of thought and in most cases profiting from their misfortune relating to academia and family life.

We all know that the new housing regeneration created very little in the way of amenities and the nation was blighted by strikes and our nation was known as the ‘sick man of Europe’.

What did the mainstream politicians do at the time to bring calm to the turbulent seas?

Not much is the answer if you were the victim of racist attacks and waking up in the morning to see the letters ‘N.F’ graffitied onto your front door or having to watch your parents being spat at and attacked.

Well, from my ethnic minority, Indian Sub-Continent third generation perspective; the white working class lost out immensely.

The National Front did nothing to help them in any way apart from use them and allow them to get criminal records and in many cases prison sentences. They became unemployable and unapproachable to mainstream society and became isolated.

What did that give them? It gave them difficulties in being able to function in society and become accepted in their communities but it harmed the white working classes in many other ways.

Whilst the young recruits to the National Front believed that they were winning ground by beating people up and terrorising communities. The people they hated and targeted, purely based on race, were preparing their children to contribute towards the U.K in a very positive manner, most people who were expelled from Uganda were of Indian origin and were British citizens.

They possessed a wealth of education and most of all a business acumen that was second to none. First generation Indian Sub-Continent parents took the abuse in their shops and the foundries of the Midlands knowing that they had a secret weapon at their disposal.

That weapon was a weapon of peace known as education, the parents fuelled their children with the ethos of education and the children became very successful in schools and commerce.

Where did that leave the white working class young people that followed the National Front?

The answer to this is clear, their minds were corrupted and their victims excelled to a new level where they became the custodians of grasping the opportunity.

The same opportunity was there for the white working class young people, did the National Front want them to access the opportunity and become competitors in the global educational market? The answer to this is no, one only needs to read my earlier statement to analyse the destruction of independent school of thought.

The National Front and other violent groups only let down the white working class youth by using them as mules and battle axes.

Once they had no use for them they were sent to the dungeons of long term unemployment and forgotten about.

Whilst this was happening to the white working classes the National Front and others would move onto the next stage of corrupting minds by convincing people that the Asians are taking all the jobs; well is it not obvious that employers would want to recruit the best educated and better equipped candidate. Or should the employer accept the ill-informed student of the National Front that would do more damage to the business by refusing to serve black and Asian origin customers?

Obviously, the National Front had no future plans for the youths that they attracted. All the National Front created was a new generation of young people that subscribed to the ideology of hatred and national socialism.

What did they really achieve?

Did they crush the ethnic minorities spirit and desire to excel in education and commerce?

If anything, the parents of the children who were of Asian origin only created a new generation of well-educated people whose will they could not smash.

What did carpet bombing achieve for the Luftwaffe; totally nothing in the end and the same can be said for the far right; achieving nothing but destruction and there was no compensation for the lives that they destroyed for both the white and ethnic minority working classes, especially where they used violence and in some cases murdered people who were racially inferior to their mind-set.

There were no wages for their torture and that applies to both white young people and ethnic minorities.

So, who was the winner out of all of this?

The populist movements only criticised Enoch Powell for silencing the debate on immigration for over forty years and made it once again acceptable to blame immigration of colour for all the problems in the U.K.

They knew fine well that there was a wave of immigration coming from Eastern Europe in 2004, however immigration that is not of visible ethnic origin cannot easily be counted whilst walking down the street. Populists capitalised on this and realised that it was time to get back into business and it is obvious from the later day antics of UKIP, EDL and Britain First it became acceptable to use hate propaganda and disguise it as reality and acceptable to talk about immigration.

I agree, it is acceptable to talk about immigration but not in a manner that has been manufactured in the factory of hate and only accepts batteries that are fuelled by causing destabilisation for our society by using methods that distances third and fourth generation British nationals from the white working classes.

It is obvious that populism and the blame factor always seems to be the embryonic recruitment stages of the most vulnerable in our society.

It extracts what it wants and leaves a society that is totally blind to reality.

Let me make this point, the white working classes must be equipped to make informative decisions. They need to be resilient to the indicators and initial stages of the hate machine igniting its pistons and picking up speed. We need to be diverse but not allow this tolerance to be abused by any group of people regardless of ethnicity.

If the white working classes can be informed and ready to take on the incoming challenge of combatting hate they will excel and even be the ambassadors of a more harmonious Great Britain, this can only be good for our nation in attracting new investors and increasing our good reputation abroad.

Nobody wants to be associated with a land of hate, nobody wants to live under fear and most certainly nobody wants their children to become dysfunctional through the exhaust fumes that the hate machine produces.

We all want a peaceful nation, we all want to live together in peace and most of all we want to Love Britain and Hate Racism.

It is our land, our home and most of all our people.

We love all the components that make a nation, a nation will always be more than just its economy because people make the economy and to make us attractive to the world for investment and trade we cannot any longer subscribe to the indoctrination of hate.

Sarinder Joshua Duroch

Author of ‘Enoch I am a British Indian’.

Follow the link for his first article for The Avenger

https://theavengeruk.com/2017/12/20/i-am-a-former-ukip-adviser-i-left-and-joined-labour-and-these-are-the-reasons-why-by-sarinder-joshua-duroch/

Why It Took Me So Long To Realise The Importance Of Education By Eddie Luigi

Let me make this clear from the start. I failed my 11+, and was thereby consigned to the ever growing ‘scrap heap’ of the under educated.

This never occurred to me to be a problem. I could read, I could write and I could accomplish basic arithmetic. You can not miss something that you never had.

I joined the Royal Navy, and learnt how to read electrical engineering manuals, in order to carry out the tasks assigned to me. My leisure reading was, purposely, limited to pulp fiction western and detective novels.

The news held no interest for me and I was quite happy blindly obeying orders. In an armed forces environment there is no place for a square peg in a round hole. Life was cosy in an environment where you were cocooned from the cares and worries of the civilian population.

Now that I have retired, and broken three television sets getting angry at day time programs, I decided to do something positive with my free time and enrolled at my local college for an access course with a view to attending university.

Now I understand why the Tories don’t want to invest in education and why the media write articles that you only need a rudimentary education to read, but not necessarily understand.

Primary and Secondary education is adequate for what used to be termed ‘factory fodder’. You are taught that this is a word and it must be true because there it is. You are taught to read the words but not taught to question the words, and as long as there is a roof over your head and food on your table you don’t particularly care. You assume an ‘I’m alright Jack’ attitude.

However, what about your children, or your children’s children.

Once you get beyond rudimentary education you start to question the written words and ask

Who wrote this?

Why did they write it?

What are they trying to achieve?

This is just the thing that the Tories want to avoid. They do not want an educated population that will question any of their policies, they require an obedient population that are happy to live off the few crumbs that might fall from the master’s banquet.

If you want a quiet life for yourself vote Tory, do not become educated, accept that ‘this is the way things are’ and ignore your children’s plaintiff cries of inequality.

“There is no more far-seeing investment for a nation than to put milk, food and education into young children” Winston Churchill 1939

Children Listening To Political Debate: Wrong or Necessary? By Kelly Grehan and Lisa Mulholland

Broadening Children’s Political Horizons? Some may say it’s wrong but it didn’t do Michael Rosen any harm.

This week we, accompanied by our children ages 13 to 8, went to an event at Conway Hall: ‘Michael Rosen In Conversation With Daniel Hahn.’

Michael was there to speak about his early life, which he chronicles in his new memoir, ‘So, They Call You Pisher.’

He spoke about parent’s running Communist Party meetings in the front room, being involved in campaigning and his acts on anti-establishment rebellion at Oxford University. Cheekily in the question and answers section we asked for a poem and, to the delight of ourselves and everyone in the room, he recited ‘Hot Food.’

Before the book signing, which we gladly joined, Michael came over and chatted to the children and commented that he hoped “they were not bored by the political talk” to which we responded that “they are used to it.”

Growing up with parents who are political activists, our children are well versed in left wing arguments, being dragged to campaigning activities and listening to furious arguments.

Is this right or wrong?

Growing up listening to arguments about football, no one ever commented on that as being anything unusual; so it is interesting to see politics often portrayed as something ‘not for the interest of children.’

Michael talked about the culture he was exposed to as a child by his parents. This was felt empathetically by our children who are regularly dragged from political rally to watch an author on a book tour, or to the theatre.

Why do we do it?

Well we think there is so much to see, so many sides of life that a person should experience in order to experience the diversity of life.

Daniel Hahn himself said to Michael ” With all the education and culture you were exposed to, it must have been difficult for the school to match this” to which Michael replied that education doesn’t have to end at the classroom.

Thinking about how restrictive the curriculum has become in the last few years with the new reforms in 2014, we think that now more than ever we need to enrich the cultural lives of our children outside of school.

With the Arts being watered down in Secondary and with Primary school children spending the majority of their time working on Maths, English and Handwriting; it is worrying that their creative abilities and critical thinking wings are being clipped before they’ve even been allowed to grow.

Some may say that teaching your children the subject of politics is wrong, or that it is indoctrinating them, but I beg to differ.

Letting them hear arguments from left wing ideology can’t be a bad thing when those arguments teach our children basic human values like sharing and social responsibility.

Of course not all parents can afford to take their children to the theatre or have the time to go to events such as these. But we feel that all children deserve to have a broad education that covers the arts, politics and other subjects not normally covered in the curriculum.

So we hope that a Labour government gets elected soon and fulfils their promise of bringing back the creative arts and broadening the educational experience of all children, not just those whose parents can afford extra curricular activities.

We are, after all a nation with a strong cultural heritage.

Without an education broader than what is currently being delivered by the curriculum set out in 2014, how do we expect to produce the future Shakespeare’s, the future David Bowie’s and the future Michael Rosen’s?

Kelly Grehan and Lisa Mulholland are the Co Founders of The Avenger UK

The worry of raising a child who has mental health issues By Miriam Gwynne 

By Miriam Gwynne

This morning was not a good morning. In fact most mornings recently have not been good.

My child has health problems but I can’t call the doctor. There is no cream I can rub onto her sore areas, no plaster I can stick onto her cuts and calpol will make no difference. She worries me so much. 

I am a sensible grounded parent. I know what to do when my child has a sore throat, or a temperature or a rash. I know if she has an accident and needs checked out I take her to hospital. I know if she is unable to keep her food down I can take her to the doctor to make sure she is not dehydrated. I have a full first aid box at home with basic over the counter remedies for most things. 


But when it comes to her mental health I am lost. 

She cries far more often than you would expect from a child her age.

She is sad far more often than you would expect from a child her age.

She has no interest in life, or toys or doing much at all. 

She has little interest in food.

She has no spark, no energy about her, no motivation. 


If she was 28 instead of 8 I have no doubt she would be diagnosed with depression and given medication.
She may even be lucky enough to be offered counselling. But she is 8 so it is different. Mental health in children is so unrecognised, so misunderstood and far too often just ignored. 

People tell me things like ‘it’s just a phase all children go through’ or ‘it could be her hormones’ or even things like ‘she is manipulating you to get her own way!’ Stop for a second and think about that: imagine if we said that about adults struggling with mental health? 
I spend so much time talking to her. Sometimes we get to the bottom of things that are bothering her, sometimes we don’t. Tomorrow it could be something else again. 

That’s what people don’t understand: the simplest thing can send my child into such a negative spiral for months. 

She is over sensitive I am told. She is just an anxious child. She will grow out of it. 

I know she won’t though. She is a child with mental health struggles and it is likely she will be an adult with mental health struggles. That worries me so much. I don’t know if she will ever manage to live alone, have a job or raise a family. She jumps every time the phone rings and panics if the door bell goes. She lives on her nerves. 

There simply isn’t  the help for children like her. Children are supposed to be energetic, care free, loving life and eager to learn. We make assumptions that if a child is sad then the parents are at fault or the child is just naughty. We say that children who struggle to eat are just fussy eaters. 

As a society we are doing our children a real disservice by not accepting that mental health issues can affect children every bit as much as they affect adults. 

It was a hard morning again today. My child struggled to eat, to get dressed and to walk to school. I worry how she will cope with all that a school day demands when her mind is so fragile. I worry about how she is interpreting what others say when she is so sensitive. I worry if her anxiety will allow her to talk or eat today. 

Had she been going to school with a broken leg everyone would know to keep her safe. Had she been going with an asthma inhaler the staff would be protecting her. Instead she is going to school with mental health difficulties and no-one seems to understand. 

It’s that lack of knowledge and lack of understanding in society that causes me to worry most as a parent of a child who has mental health issues. 

Miriam Gwynne is a renowned blogger who has her own site where she discusses issues she faces raising two children on the autistic spectrum 

https://faithmummy.wordpress.com/

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My Open Letter to The PM About How Austerity Affected My Childs’ Mental Health

By Lisa Mulholland 

Dear Prime Minister  

I feel compelled to give you an insight into how austerity has affected my family.  
Tonight, I sit here in despair, anxious about tomorrow and what the day will bring. I wonder what battles I will have to fight tomorrow to ensure that the eldest of my three children has access to a service that everyone is entitled to; an adequate education.  

What strings am I going to have to pull tomorrow? 

How on earth am I going to manipulate the system this week, just to get a fair chance at a place at a school that meets his needs, or to get access to mental health service, or health service for that matter?

I wonder what tactics I’m going to have to resort to this week. Yes. This week. The overwhelming challenges change weekly. These are the things that are going to keep me awake tonight.  

You see, my 11-year-old son is high functioning autistic. He also has ADHD, dyspraxia and some possible mental health issues. He is what the paediatricians would call ‘complex’.  

They have a 2-year waiting list just to diagnose a child with autism.
I know this because my youngest child is on that waiting list. It’s a pretty confusing place to be, pretty desolate, pretty frustrating. Not at all pretty really.  

My eldest needs to be treated by CAMHS. But In some parts of Kent there is a 5-month waiting list for children or teenagers that need ‘urgent’ treatment. By urgent I mean suicidal. I know this because the poor receptionist at CAMHS has told me so. She must deal with many desperate parents daily.  

I am lucky that I have only waited 8 weeks for my ‘urgent’ referral to CAMHS.  So here I am, feeling lucky.
Waiting for the paediatrician to plead with CAMHS to treat my anxious son. They are overstretched and are trying to pass my son onto the paediatric services. So, they are now in a battle, and my son is piggy in the middle. 

Even after referrals from the ADHD nurse, GP and a paediatrician working the night shift at A and E (yes, we ended up in A &E when his panic attack prevented him from being able to breathe) we have waited and the problem has escalated. 

He cannot leave the house without having a panic attack.  The only school that is suitable and can possibly meet his needs also have a long and difficult history and they are wary of taking him on. The children that attend that school are very vulnerable and have also been pushed from pillar to post. Getting a place in a specialist school, especially this one, is not straightforward.  

You see their funding was cut last year and they were to be closed permanently. They were saved at the last minute but they are now under very high pressure to perform better and stay open. Can they afford to waste a precious place on my son who might not be able to manage there? 

Tomorrow my anxious, autistic son who desperately wants to go to school, who desperately wants to go to university, must swallow his anxiety, crush all his fears, put two failed school placements behind him and go and spend a day at this school (without the promise of a place).  
He must try his utmost best to convince them that he fits their criteria. I know they do not want him there. I haven’t told him this. I have had to give him many pep talks tonight. We have had tears, self -harm and panic attacks and the night is only just beginning. 
I know I won’t sleep. He may wake several times with night terrors tonight. Who knows what will happen.  
Nevertheless, I will get up in the morning and pray he holds it together long enough for them to see that he is worth teaching. I will then come home and call CAMHS and plead with them to treat my son for this anxiety that is preventing him from leaving the house and getting an education.  

It isn’t CAMHS fault, it isn’t the Schools’ fault, it isn’t the local authorities fault and it is not the paediatricians’ fault.  
Who is to blame?  

It isn’t my son.  

It isn’t me. 

I did not ask to have an autistic child in a time where services are on their knees and schools cannot cope with children like mine. Where funding for schools, and all NHS Services have been slashed. Who would have imagined services in the 6th richest nation in the world would get this bad? 

Crippling cuts to services under the guise of a false ‘austerity’ is not the way forward. It is merely an ideological tool that suits your agenda but not ours. 

But it’s not YOUR money to spend as you see fit!! We have paid for services via tax and national insurance and we aren’t receiving them. It is OUR money and we deserve the services we pay for.  

You represent us, you work for us. You cannot do that without understanding us, the people. 

Democracy is supposed to be “For the People, Of the People and By the People”. 

Yours 

Lisa 

A mum, a voter, a volunteer, a campaigner.

 

Lisa’s letter attracted the attention of the BBC and eventually her letter was read out to the Director Of CAMHS. To find out what happened next please click here:

https://theavengeruk.com/2017/09/18/my-letter-to-the-pm-about-my-childs-mental-health-got-an-unexpected-response/

Theresa May: Childcare Thief

In what world is it ok to forcibly sell somebody else’s product and then refuse to give the original owner what it cost for that product? I’m going to use an analogy most parents like me will appreciate: wine!

Imagine the scenario: I walk into the corner shop with my friend after promising to buy her a bottle of wine, I pick up a nice hearty red costing £6.30, take it to the counter and tell the shop worker that I’m only paying £5 for the wine. The store owner comes along to tell me that they can’t sell the wine at this price because they couldn’t continue to run an effective business, meet the cost of wages, overheads etc if they were to do so. I leave the £5 on the counter, take the wine, give it to my friend as the kind gift I originally offered.

Would you expect either the friend or shop owner to be happy with this outcome? No!

Sure, your friend now has a bottle of wine which they’ve not had to pay for but they feel guilty, in some way responsible for the injustice which has been committed against the shop owner. They might want to pay the difference but be unable to. They might want to give the wine back and go without.

While my friend is making her decision, the police have also been called as what I have done is clearly theft. There’s no ambiguity here; I just stole from the corner shop.

But what if it wasn’t wine? What if it was childcare which was promised as a gift? What if you can’t offer to pay the difference or give the ‘gift’ back to the business owner because without it you can’t afford to work or cover your own bills and outgoings? What then?

This is exactly what is happening all over the country. How is it ok?

A product (childcare), has been forcibly taken and handed out to thousands of families across the country as a nice gift, but the providers are not being given the going rate for their service leaving them on average 20% short.

This isn’t a gift, it’s theft!

Like the shop owner, the nurseries should call the police, right? Unfortunately, the perpetrators in this instance, the thieves, the villain, is the government of this country and there is nothing the victims of this theft can do.

The Telegraph has today reported: “One in five providers surveyed by the National Day Nurseries Association, a childcare charity, are not offering the free 30 hours because they say they cannot afford it. And more than half of those that are participating in the scheme are having to increase parents’ costs.”

The Pre-school Learning Alliance conducted a survey of childcare providers in March 2017 which showed similar results: “Less than half of providers [are] currently planning to roll out the offer, and a quarter saying that it is “likely” they will close”.

The situation is set to get worse. The government’s plan to freeze early years funding until 2019-20 will leave us with an even bigger problem on our hands. Childcare providers will feel the squeeze even more as running costs continue to rise with inflation whilst funding does not.

If everyone is happy with the nation’s children being looked after by the least experienced and qualified staff to keep down staffing costs. Happy with younger, even less experienced staff, to avoid paying the so-called ‘living wage’. Happy with buildings and equipment being updated and maintained less regularly. Happy for lower cost materials, foods, nappies to be used for our children during their most important years developmentally, then we have no problem here. I expect for most people, they wouldn’t be happy for any of these things to become commonplace.

Dear friend, don’t offer me a bottle of wine (especially in order to buy my friendship) if you can’t afford to buy a bottle of wine. Or at least humbly admit that you’re unable to follow through on your kind offer, but please don’t steal the wine.

Dear Conservative Government, don’t offer to provide me with 30 hours free childcare (especially to compete with Ed Milliband’s Labour promise and win my vote) if you can’t afford to pay for 30 hours of childcare at the going rate. Or at least humbly admit that you’re unable to follow through on your kind offer, but please don’t steal the childcare.